Collective Soul: New Singles

see-what-you-started-by-continuingThey snuck up on me.  Collective Soul has released three singles this summer from their upcoming release See What You Started By Continuing.

The first, “This,” is a rocker with a catchy, chord based riff.  It is reminiscent of their older work and Ed Roland does a fine job getting the most out of his voice.  I am a big fan and it is a reminder to a world in love with American Idol, The Voice, and the like that a perfect singing voice is not required to front a great rock band if you have passion and write songs that compliment strengths and minimize weaknesses.  The “oooh-ooohs” remind me that the band is really a power pop outfit now, but I am okay with that reality in a post grunge age.  Newcomer, Jesse Tripplet’s solo sears, invoking the band’s glory days.

“AYTA (Are You the Answer),” the second single is more of a ballad and hooked me with the fancy picking during the chorus.  As it is often the case with Collective Soul, the song works as a love song, but even better as a spiritual hymn.  Thought provoking. Compare to classics like “Better Now,” “No More, No Less,” and breakthrough “Shine.”

Blues is the name of the name of the game in “Hurricane,” the most recent release.  The main riff is fun and a upbeat version of something I’d expect from Queens of the Stone Age.  Yet, it is heavy, both musically and lyrically.  I hope there are more moody tracks like this on fully album.

I’m grateful for new music from a band from my youth.  The full album is due out in October. Listen to the singles now:  https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/see-what-you-started-by-continuing/id1023916182

 

*Husky Harlequin is the author of the new time travel novel Time’s Alibi or The Quantum of Jazz Between the Sun and the Grave.  It’s more than SciFi; it’s a political statement.  Grab a copy and visit another dimension during your lunch break.

www.HuskyHarlequin.com

 

Cecil the Lion, Steve Zissou, and The Hunter

LifeaquaticposterI am captivated by the Cecil the lion matter.  For those of you who do not know, he was killed by an American dentist seeking a hunting trophy a few weeks ago.  Like many, I had never heard of Cecil before his death, but I find myself thinking about my dog, Pepper, when I read about the lion.  I’m not saying that hunting for a trophy is wrong, but I don’t understand it.  It makes me sad to think about loosing my dog someday in the future, even though he can be a colossal pain sometimes.  I wonder if that is how folks who knew Cecil feel?  I don’t know.

I’ve been thinking about two movies that relate to the subject, at least in my own crazy mind.  The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is one of my all time favorites.  Many of my friends and family have not been able to appreciate this film when they have allowed me to screen it for them.  Bill Murray, as the title character, is absolute fantastic as the host of a ocean based nature show.  Yes, the movie is very silly.  But it is also insanely serious as Zissou is searching for the fish that killed his best friend in order to get revenge.  As Zissou loses himself, he finds himself, even if he can’t put his finger on how he got lost in the first place.  Check it out and let me know what you think.

 

Hunter_ver3The Hunter with Wilem Defoe flew largely under the radar.  I watched it one night when I couldn’t find anything else more enticing and it has been with me since.  It is haunting.  The story is believable, built around the Tazmanian Tiger, which is believed to be extinct for some time.  Defoe, the titular hunter, is hired to find and bring back a specimen when a lone animal is spotted in the wilderness.   It challenges the audience to a game of bioethics.  Can the Hunter, as wild as his prey, be taught by nature about what makes humanity so special?  .  Are Zissou and the Hunter different versions of the same man?  Tell me what you think.  I’ll be back after spending some time with my buddy, Pepper.

 

*Husky Harlequin is the author of the new time travel novel Time’s Alibi or The Quantum of Jazz Between the Sun and the Grave.  It’s more than SciFi; it’s a political statement.  Grab a copy and visit another dimension during your lunch break.

www.HuskyHarlequin.com

 

 

 

Review: Mission Impossible – Rogue Nation

Mission_Impossible_Rogue_Nation_posterEthan Hunt drops in for another round.  And like a prize fighter, he delivers plenty of punch.  But this time, it’s not so easy.  Hunt is no longer in his prime (think recent James Bond).  He’s vulnerable as his skill are repeatedly matched by the evil Syndicate.  As always, Cruise thrives in the underdog roll.  I’m not complaining!

There is no shortage of fun and special effects, but this mission is reminiscent of the mystery and mind games of Brian DePalma’s more subtle first chapter of the franchise back in 1996.  To me, that is a good thing, as the audience is right next to Hunt trying to figure out friend/foe and who is really behind the Syndicate.

While the cargo plane scene was greatly hyped–rightfully so–it is the high speed motorcycle chase that stood out to me.  It was impossible to miss how real it feels.  My only gripe is that Jeremy Renner, who was introduced in MI4, was severely underutilized in this installment.  Don’t wait for home video release, go see it now:  feel the breeze–in your hair.

*Husky Harlequin is the author of the new time travel novel Time’s Alibi or The Quantum of Jazz Between the Sun and the Grave.  It’s more than SciFi; it’s a political statement.  Grab a copy and visit another dimension during your lunch break.

www.HuskyHarlequin.com